Moving to the Hardware Certification Team

After two years and a half in the Ubuntu QA team I have moved to the Hardware Certification team, on Platform Services. I was very happy to be given the opportunity to join the Hardware Certification team and I couldn’t reject. I am very excited to be able to help in the goal of making Canonical profitable.

How will that affect my collaboration with Ubuntu QA

It is been a great pleasure to work all this time with a great group of peopleĀ  (both Canonical and non-Canonical). Obviously, as working directly on Ubuntu QA won’t be part of my paid job, I won’t be able to dedicate it as much as time as I did before. So, first of all, sorry if I am not getting back to you as quickly as I did in the past. But I love the Ubuntu QA community and I am still part of it. I will still be working on some of the things I did before, in my spare time. There are some projects, like the Desktop Testing Program or Desktop Testing Automation that are very close to my heart and I would like to stay somehow involved with them, I will try to attend the Ubuntu QA meeting at least twice per month and I will stay active in the ubuntu-qa mailing list.

The Hardware Certification Team

Having a successful certification program is both beneficial for vendors, ensuring their costumers that the hardware will work with Ubuntu, and the Ubuntu community, as they have access to the list of systems that work out of the box. We agree that sometimes we don’t expose the Hardware Certification program to our community as much as we should. There are people very active in the Ubuntu development that don’t know that Canonical has a public website where people can check what systems are certified to work with Ubuntu or even that the certification program exists. We don’t keep it as a secret, though; the Hardware Certification team has been attending UDS, our main testing tool is open sourced and installed by default in Ubuntu and, as I said, the systems that have been certified are published. I understand that we can do a better job explaining how the hardware certification program itself works and keep it more in the open, accepting suggestion and criticism.

To start with, Victor, the Hardware Certification team manager, has written a wiki page to explain a bit how the certification programs works and we have now a public project in Launchpad where you will be able to file bugs related to the project or ask questions. We would love to hear your thoughts and feedback about the program. In return, we will make our best to improve the program in ways that makes it more useful for our community.

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